Suchen Mitgliederliste Usermap clubmitglied Heatmap|Trading-Signale   amazon amazon   amazon Kicktipp   registriere dich kostenlos und nutze die Vorteile einer Anmeldung auf peketec.de Hier kostenlos registrieren!
Login Login

home » Börsenforum » Trading im Rohstoffsegment powered by CCG » Fachwissen im Rohstoffbereich
 Zur Seite: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Weiter 
Breite
Heute stehen keine weiteren Termine an. » zu den Börsenterminen von Montag
Hinweis: Morgen Börsenfeiertag US-Anleihemarkt, US-Aktienmarkt NYSE, Nasdaq.
Das Team von peketec.de wünscht allen Tradern und Investoren ein erholsames Wochenende :-)
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag127/127, 15.06.11, 10:24:23  | Fachwissen im Rohstoffbereich
Antworten mit Zitat
Alles wissenswerte in der Theorie!
gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag126/127, 15.06.11, 10:25:10 
Antworten mit Zitat

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag125/127, 15.06.11, 10:25:25 
Antworten mit Zitat

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag124/127, 15.06.11, 10:25:50 
Antworten mit Zitat
http://www.ttrl.co.nz/cms.aspx?page....Mining_concept&flag=1
gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag123/127, 15.06.11, 10:26:08 
Antworten mit Zitat
http://www.cim.org/committees/cimdefstds_dec11_05.pdf

Measured,indicated,interfered Resources!
gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag122/127, 15.06.11, 10:30:54 
Antworten mit Zitat
golden_times schrieb am 21.08.2009, 07:02 Uhr
POG: Indikatoren

http://seekingalpha.com/article/157....ant-gold-price-indicators

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag121/127, 15.06.11, 10:32:32 
Antworten mit Zitat
dukezero schrieb am 27.08.2009, 10:12 Uhr
Juniors, Metals, and Projects: The Good, The Bad, and The Butt-Ugly
A Primer for the Lay Investor


By : Mickey Fulp

The Mercenary Geologist

Miningcompanyreport.com


I get all kinds of requests generated by my website, mostly via email, some in person, some via phone. Most are from people I don’t know and they usually solicit information. Most of those inquiries I welcome and am glad to offer opinions freely, such as espousing my views on investment philosophy, libertarianism, macroeconomics, commodity markets, or business ideology. As you know, the many topics which I write about are posted for free on my website and picked up by many other sites on the internet.

Other types of information require compensation. You pay for it one way (in fiat currency) or the other (quid pro quo). Examples include my views on a specific stock, a geological analysis of data, a financial evaluation, or a business consultation.

An opinion on a specific stock is not free; you will have to pay me to write an evaluation, unless it comes thru an off-the-cuff conversation such as: “What do you like? What do I like?”; you know, tit-for-tat sort of stuff. These types of conversations are generally with people in the business that I have known for years and whose opinions I value and trust.

My formal evaluations for individual investors are done at a deeply discounted rate. But my opinions are still not cheap. You are paying for my 7 years of geological education and 30 years of on-the-job experience evaluating projects and companies. I have a dedicated cadre of subscribers who use this service on a regular basis and several have become my friends. Even though I don’t make a lot of money, I welcome evaluations on behalf of my subscribers and hope that my opinions prove useful.

However, there is one thing I don’t do, will not do, and cannot legally do: Tell you to buy or sell a stock. If you ask, all I can say is no since I am not qualified to recommend stocks or give investment advice. DYODD, Dude says Otto. I could not agree more. Read my disclaimer at the end.

Now that I’ve upchucked that rant which has been stuck in my gullet for awhile, let’s go on to a new free topic to make you a more successful investor.

This is the third of my on-going series: “A Primer for the Lay Investor” and addresses the following subjects:

* Which commodities should a junior resource company explore for? The Good.
* Which commodities generally should be avoided by a junior resource company? The Bad.
* Which commodities should a junior resource company avoid at all cost? The Butt-Ugly.

Since the majority of junior resource companies explore for and/or mine metals, I will restrict today’s discussion to the metallic elements of the periodic chart. This is not to denigrate energy fluids or solids (except to say that no Venture Exchange junior should explore for geothermal energy), industrial minerals, or agricultural minerals. Those commodities are another musing for another time.

And I truly wish it were that simple: The Good, The Bad, and The Butt-Ugly. But it’s not.

I’m just your basic dumb field geologist, a prospector-mapper in camo gear, a fairly simple soul with simple needs and a simple lifestyle, and so I prefer to take the simple approach. Simple is good; complicated is…well… frigging complicated. When working as a geologist making a map, I avoid a complex solution unless field data forces me to make the story more complicated. Here’s a simple way to say it: I am a lumper, not a splitter.

But I must add a complication to the simplistic three tier treatment of metal commodities for investment: The geological environment and setting. As investors, we need to know the type of deposit to look for and its geological, geographical, physical, and chemical characteristics: The lithology (rock types), the structure, the alteration, the mineralization, and the metallurgy (recovery process) set in four dimensional space and time (The Fourth Dimension, May 5, 2008).

For example: An open-pit heap leach gold deposit in Mexico’s Sonoran desert is an attractive target for a junior; a deep underground gold deposit in the Witwatersrand of South Africa is not. The reasons some deposit types are good prospective targets for juniors and others are not will become apparent below.

Now that the groundwork is laid, I will offer opinions on commodities and deposit types that junior resource explorers or miners should (The Good), should very seldom (The Bad), and absolutely should not (The Butt-Ugly) select for flagship projects.

I need to ask your indulgence, too. Be aware that these are simply Mickey the Mercenary Geologist’s Rules of Thumb and there are exceptions to every rule of the opposing digit variety. I can give you at least one company that contradicts my “Rule of Thumb” for all of the Bad and even a couple of the Butt-Ugly examples listed below.

The Good:

Gold + silver deposits that are configured for open pit mining, heap leach extraction, carbon-in-pulp recovery, and direct shipping of dore bars to a precious metals refinery: These deposits can be developed in temperate climates in many places in the world, do not require significant stand-alone infrastructure, and have low operating costs and capital expenditures. There are many successful junior companies that have, are, or will successfully sell out to a larger mining company or generate cash flow, payback capital, and reward shareholders handsomely as small to mid-tier gold producers.

Copper oxide deposits that allow open pit mining, heap leach extraction, solvent extraction and electrowining (SX/EW), and direct shipping of copper cathode plates to a rod or wire plant: These deposits are analogous to the gold deposits described above in mining, processing, and economic valuation. Copper oxide mines require relatively low capital expenditures, are environmentally benign, can be quickly permitted, and are easily reclaimed. Since sulfuric acid comprises the highest percentage of cash costs, a secure source of it is crucial. Therefore, geographical preference is within a region close to an existing copper smelter, sulfur mine, or sour gas field. Although many copper oxide miners are not profitable at $1.50/lb copper, they are robustly economic at $2.50 or $3.00/lb. Copper demand and price is currently depressed, but juniors developing projects for copper cathode production in two-four years are well-positioned to succeed and reward shareholders.

Uranium deposits that are amenable to open pit mining and heap leach extraction or in-situ leach mining (ISL), ion exchange recovery, and precipitation into yellowcake: Deposits located in current or past-producing districts with infrastructure and permitting processes in place allow successful development within a reasonable mid-term period. Conventional open pit and ISL projects in the western United States have low cash operating costs and capital requirements within the financing ability of many well-run junior companies. In the coming years there will be a consolidation of juniors, majors, sovereign companies, and sovereign wealth funds into consortiums to develop major uranium projects. Domestic USA uranium production currently supplies less than 10% of yearly consumption and that shortfall will be exacerbated by cessation of Russian imports in 2013. Worldwide projections show a supply deficit of U3O8 for the next 10 years.

The Bad:

Polymetallic (combined base and precious metals) deposits of any kind: These would include my least favorite, the volcanogenic or sedimentary-exhalative massive sulfide deposits, and also nickel-cobalt-chrome-PGE deposits and lead-zinc-silver veins and replacements: All of these generally require extensive surface drilling followed by underground sampling, drilling, and development, underground mining, expensive infrastructure with grinding mills producing multiple flotation concentrates, and shipment to smelters, often to two or perhaps three plants across the world for pyrometallurgical recovery of the various metals. Mining, milling, and recovery costs are relatively high and profit margins slim. Capital expenditures are beyond the means of junior companies.

Porphyry copper + molybdenum, gold, and/or silver deposits: These projects are very large and require ten or more years to explore, permit, and develop an economic ore body. That is longer than the lifespan of most juniors. In addition, the capital required for development is much beyond the capability of any microcap to small cap junior or mid-tier mining company. Today an economic copper porphyry deposit requires $2-3 billion or more to develop. The sole business model that can be successful for a junior explorer is sale to one of the few major copper mining conglomerates in the world. Those potential suitors are growing larger and fewer as mergers, acquisitions, and hostile takeovers continue in the global mining industry and their deposit size thresholds continue to grow, too.

Iron oxide deposits of any geological type anywhere on the planet: Because of the bulk material character, immense size of the deposits, and large, centralized processing facilities required to compete economically in the world, they require too much capital expenditure for a junior with limited access to debt and equity financing to succeed. Again the only successful “out” is if a sovereign-backed company or major comes in with a buyout offer. Much like the copper business, there are fewer large iron ore producers in the world today than ten years ago with world production dominated by three multi-national mining conglomerates.

The Butt-Ugly:

Molybdenum porphyries: Molybdenum is the most fi.. metal on the face of the Earth. Price is controlled by supply as a by-product from giant porphyry copper mines (60%) and recycled scrap steel (30%) and worldwide demand for alloy steel, resulting in historically volatile price ranges. Ten percent or so is supplied by primary producers; that amount is the “swing” and this production is highly dependent on world economic health and cyclical supply and demand of the steel industry. China is the largest primary producer and the United States is second with four major, high grade western mines. Three months ago it was projected to be five US producers with one of the best orebodies in the world (Climax) re-opening in 2010. But in a three week span, the molybdenum price fell from $33/lb to $11/lb and development was suspended indefinitely by Freeport McMoran Inc. This is not a commodity where a junior can successfully develop a competitive deposit or get taken out by a major.

Unconventional deposits: This is a scientific euphemism for “not economic now and will not be economic in the foreseeable future”. “Unconventional” is a term coined by USGS Ph.D. geologists in the 1970’s to describe their pet research projects on metal occurrences in unusual geological environments and deposit types not considered exploitable because of grade or metallurgy. Examples include:

* The gargantuan Duluth Gabbro copper-nickel-PGE deposit of northeast Minnesota which has been known and explored for over 50 years or the similar Marathon deposit of northwest Ontario. Both are low grade, metallurgically complex, and would require billions of dollars in capital expenditures to develop;
* Vanadium-titanium deposits of northern Quebec which cannot compete economically with vanadium produced as a by-product from uranium mines, steel smelter slag, and petroleum residues and titanium which is strip mined in heavy minerals sands near tidewater;
* Rhyolite-hosted uranium deposits which are too small, low grade, and/or spotty to have produced a significant “hard rock uranium” mine anywhere in the world.

Specialty or rare metals: These metals include lithium, beryllium, cobalt, gallium, germanium, niobium, indium, tantalum, tungsten, and rare earth elements, among others. They have limited uses, small, tightly controlled, often monopolistic markets, and sensitive supply and demand curves with the world’s entire yearly consumption often supplied by one exceptional deposit, one company, or one country, or as by-products from other mining operations and processors. Junior explorers generally cannot compete in these extremely competitive markets. Examples include:

* Tungsten which is used mainly in carbide and composite metal alloys. Producing North American mines in California, Nevada, and British Columbia were undercut and closed when flooded by cheap Chinese production imported into North America in the mid to late 1980’s. China currently supplies 85% of yearly mine output;
* Beryllium which is used in metal, oxide, and copper alloy forms in aerospace, defense, and high tech applications. Over 85% of world production comes from unique rhyolite-hosted deposits mined at Spor Mountain, Utah by a single company.
* Niobium is used in nickel, cobalt and steel super alloys and for electrical components in the steel and aerospace industries. Tantalum is used mostly in capacitors for computer and communication devices. These metals always occur together in nature. World production of niobium is dominated by Brazil in carbonatite deposits (95%) and most tantalum (55%) is produced from pegmatites in Australia and the aforementioned deposits in Brazil (22%). The only North American production is from a small pegmatite mine in Manitoba.

When evaluating a junior resource stock for investment, it always comes around to three key criteria: Share structure, people, and projects.

By applying commodity and deposit type likes and dislikes to vet a company’s flagship project, I can quickly eliminate more than half of the junior issuers on the Venture Stock Exchange from further consideration. With 1750 junior companies, that’s the idea as an analyst, eliminate the many No’s ASAP and focus on the few possible Yea’s.

I cannot emphasize enough that these are simply Rules of Thumb or guidelines if you will, the deposit types presented are merely examples, the list is nowhere comprehensive, and there are exceptions for many of the commodities and deposit types listed above.

For instance: I cover a rare earth element company that is one of my favorite juniors because it has a unique, potentially world class deposit that may be able to compete with Chinese producers; I own shares in a bauxite explorer, ground usually tread by major multi-metal mining conglomerates; and I own shares in a company with an advanced copper-gold-silver porphyry project. The latter two were bought during the commodities bull market and I probably would not choose to take down those private placements today even at the lower prices where they currently trade. But they remain good, long-term takeover plays and I have not sold a share of either since they became free-trading.

A critical part of an investor’s due diligence in considering a junior for investment should be an assessment its flagship property. It should contain a permissive commodity in a deposit type that is appropriate for the technical and financial capabilities of a junior resource company.

It is my hope that these guidelines presented in the third installment of my series, A Primer for the Lay Investor, will help you become a more astute and better investor.

Now let’s go make some money.

Ciao for now,





Mickey Fulp

The Mercenary Geologist

Miningcompanyreport.com



The Mercenary Geologist Michael S. “Mickey” Fulp is a Certified Professional Geologist with a B.Sc. Earth Sciences with honor from the University of Tulsa, and M.Sc. Geology from the University of New Mexico. Mickey has 30 years experience as an exploration geologist searching for economic deposits of base and precious metals, industrial minerals, coal, uranium, and water in North and South America and China.

Mickey has worked for junior explorers, major mining companies, private companies, and investors as a consulting economic geologist for the past 22 years, specializing in geological mapping and property evaluation. In addition to Mickey’s professional credentials and experience, he is high-altitude proficient and is bilingual in English and Spanish. From 2003 to 2006, Mickey made four outcrop ore discoveries in Peru, Nevada, Chile, and British Columbia.

Mickey is well known throughout the mining and exploration community for his ongoing work as an analyst for public and private companies, investment funds, newsletter and website writers, private investors, and brokers.

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag120/127, 15.06.11, 10:32:51 
Antworten mit Zitat
dukezero schrieb am 31.08.2009, 14:36 Uhr
http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/....574,25949291-3102,00.html

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag119/127, 15.06.11, 10:33:20  | Titel: Mining knowledge
Antworten mit Zitat
golden_times schrieb am 31.08.2009, 17:06 Uhr
Geology and Mining Terms Dictionary



http://goldoz.com.au/34.0.html

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag118/127, 15.06.11, 10:34:27  | Quick Guide to Assay Results
Antworten mit Zitat
golden_times schrieb am 01.09.2009, 16:54 Uhr
Quick Guide to Assay Results

http://ca.geocities.com/qtrader@rogers.com/assayguide.html

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag117/127, 15.06.11, 10:34:40  | Miscellaneous Information
Antworten mit Zitat
Miscellaneous Information

http://ca.geocities.com/qtrader@rogers.com/index.html
gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag116/127, 15.06.11, 10:35:07 
Antworten mit Zitat
zerberus schrieb am 01.09.2009, 22:54 Uhr
Nix-Blicker Frage von mir:

Ich habe ja von den ganzen Explorern keinen blassen Schimmer. Wie ich schon Golden Times per Boardmail erzählt habe, habe ich schon versucht mich in das Thema einzuarbeiten. Wie erkennt man potentielle Produzenten etc.

Ich hatte auch schon früher Rohstoffexplorer zb. ATW Venture und die IRON Aktie.Die hatte ich glücklichweise am 1. Handelstag in Canada ordentlich geladen.hihihi

Ich habe mit einigen Leuten schon zu diesem Thema gesprochen, die haben mir Bohrkerne gezeigt oder Bilder von Bohrungsgebieten (stellenweise ganz schön eklige Umweltverschmutzung da) Naja egal. Zumindest habe ich es letzendlich aufgeben mich dort einzuarbeiten weil, ich es nicht kapiert habe (zu doof, keine Ahnung von Geologie,Chemie und Physik)


Was mir besonders nicht in die Rübe will: Die Explorer(ob serioes oder nicht) schriebn immer das sie zig Millionen Tonnen an Ressourcen von Gold,SIlber Kupfer Eisenerz usw. bei sich im Boden zu liegen haben.

Wenn das so ist, warum fallen die Rohstoffpreise nicht? Ich meine wenn man sich mal den Spass macht und von den tausenden Explorern die ganzen Resourcen zusammenrechnet, dann müsste es doch eine Schwemme von Gold, Silber Kupfer usw. geben oder etwa nicht?

Bitte in einfachen Worten erklären..Kein Fachchinesisch...

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag115/127, 15.06.11, 10:35:17 
Antworten mit Zitat
dukezero schrieb am 01.09.2009, 23:02 Uhr
zerberus schrieb am 01.09.2009, 22:54 Uhr
Nix-Blicker Frage von mir:



Also da muss ich die nächsten Tage ein bisschen ausholen,- und das ist eine Frage die man
ausführlich diskutieren sollte.
Mein Posting Nr. 7 ist da schonmal interessant. Hier wird ja schonmal erklärt welches Deposit
überhaupt abbauwürdig ist und sich zu einer Mine entwickeln kann.

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag114/127, 15.06.11, 10:35:39 
Antworten mit Zitat
golden_times schrieb am 02.09.2009, 10:39 Uhr
Wir haben gegenwärtig 6,5Mrd Menschen auf dieser Welt, bis zum Jahr 2050 prophezeiht man bis zu 10 Mrd Menschen auf unserem Planeten. Die prekäre Lage um die Rohstoff- und Energieversorgung der nächsten Jahrzehnte wird unser Hauptthema bleiben, die aufstrebenden Länder (BRIC, China, Indien) werden diesen Trend kraftvoll unterstützen und für viele zukünftige Engpässe sorgen.
Setze diese gigantische Nachfrage nun einmal in Relation zu dem täglich schmilzenden Angebot.

Die letzten Jahre konnten wir bsp. stark steigende Investitionen in den Gold-Explorationssektor
beobachten, der Rohstoff kam durch die hohen Inflationserwartungen quasi "neu" in Mode und wird heute von unzähligen geschätzten Größen als einzig wahrer Inflationsschutz empfohlen. Es flossen demnach weitere dreistellige Milliardenbeträge in die Exploration neuer Goldeposits, Gold konnte als einziger Rohstoff in der Krise Gewinne verzeichnen..
Das große Problem dieser rießigen Investitionen: Sie verlieren langsam aber sicher die Relation zu den unersätzlichen Industrierohstoffen! Edelmetalle können einer Wirtschaft nicht zu Wachstum verhelfen, wir sind darauf angewiesen in Basisrohstoffe zu investieren. Durch die drastische Senkung der Explorationsbudgets für die Industrierohstoffe (wegen Marktschwäche und kurzfr. schwacher Nachfrage) auf der ganzen Welt, wird es in absehbarer Zeit zu größeren Engpässen kommen müssen! Die Folgen sind stark steigende Rohstoffpreise, die Inflation wird enorm ansteigen!

Faktisch betrachtet können wir ca. 5000 börsennotierte Explorer, Developer und Produzenten an den Börsen in Kanada und Australien handeln. Die Hälfte dieser Werte sind banal gestrickte Explorer, die meistens nur eines oder wenige, völlig unerforschte Projekte vorweisen können. Ohne größere Finanzierungen und tatkräftige Kapitalgeber kommen diese Firmen wegen der fehlenden Selektion schnell unter Druck, eine starke Verwässerung ist in vielen Fällen unausweichlich.
Schätzungsweiße 1000 der übrigen Werte haben ein gegenwärtig tragfähiges Geschäftsmodell, eine relativ sichere geopolitische Lage, rohstoffreiche Liegenschaften und eine reale Möglichkeit (bzw. Begebenheit), Rohstoffe aus diesen Liegenschaften gegenwärtig und(/oder) in Zukunft ökonomisch zu fördern. Von diesen letzten 1000 Werten (global betrachtet doch wirklich keine große Anzahl) sind die meisten Werte natürlich Produzenten.
Wieviele Werte bleiben dann noch für die großen und erfolgreiche Explorer -> Produzenten-Storys übrig? Diese wenigen Werte gilt es zu finden..

Nur wenige große Rohstoffproduzenten decken die größten Anteile der Energie- und Industrierohstoffe ab! Diese Firmen werden notgedrungen Billionen in den nächsten Jahrzehnten in die Exploration investieren müssen, um die nachhaltige Rohstoffversorgung aufrecht zu erhalten.

Unsere Energie- und Industrierohstoffe sind fast alle entlich, wir sind daraus angewiesen das Angebot an diesen Rohstoffen hochzuhalten, um den langfristig steigenden Rohstoffhunger (trotz rückläufiger Nachfrage bleibt auch gegenwärtig ein hoher Rohstoffbedarf!) erfolgreich zu stillen.
Wir haben letzten Frühsommer bereits gemerkt, in welche angespannten Lage uns wir eigentlich befinden, als der Ölpreis in einem strammen Aufwärtstrend fast die 150$-Marke tangierte, erste Branchen drohten zu kollabieren. Flug- und Transportunternehmen wollten schon ihre gesamten Geschäfsmodelle umstellen und sich gegen die "hohen" Preise abzusichern, die Entscheidungen fielen zu spät.. (einige Fluggesellschaften sicherten sich mithilfe Zertifikaten gegen steigende Ölpreise ab, diese Strategie kann natürlich nur funktioeren, wenn der Ölpreis weiter stark bleibt! Wir wissen heute, wie stark und schnell der folgende Einbruch kam..)

Die globale Wirtschaft und jede Volkswirtschaft ist primär in enormer Abhängigkeit von den jeweiligen Energierohstoffen (Öl, Kohle, Gas). Diese Energierohstoffe, allen voran Öl, werden die gesamte Rohstoffbranche führen! Ohne dieses schwarze Gold funktioniert absolut nichts in unserer Welt..

Empfehle dir für ein besseres Verständnis folgendes Buch, mE unersätzliches Basiswissen für Rohstoffinvestoren.
"The Oil Factor" - von Stephen Leep

» zur Grafik


zerberus schrieb am 01.09.2009, 22:54 Uhr
Nix-Blicker Frage von mir:

Ich habe ja von den ganzen Explorern keinen blassen Schimmer. Wie ich schon Golden Times per Boardmail erzählt habe, habe ich schon versucht mich in das Thema einzuarbeiten. Wie erkennt man potentielle Produzenten etc.

Ich hatte auch schon früher Rohstoffexplorer zb. ATW Venture und die IRON Aktie.Die hatte ich glücklichweise am 1. Handelstag in Canada ordentlich geladen.hihihi

Ich habe mit einigen Leuten schon zu diesem Thema gesprochen, die haben mir Bohrkerne gezeigt oder Bilder von Bohrungsgebieten (stellenweise ganz schön eklige Umweltverschmutzung da) Naja egal. Zumindest habe ich es letzendlich aufgeben mich dort einzuarbeiten weil, ich es nicht kapiert habe (zu doof, keine Ahnung von Geologie,Chemie und Physik)


Was mir besonders nicht in die Rübe will: Die Explorer(ob serioes oder nicht) schriebn immer das sie zig Millionen Tonnen an Ressourcen von Gold,SIlber Kupfer Eisenerz usw. bei sich im Boden zu liegen haben.

Wenn das so ist, warum fallen die Rohstoffpreise nicht? Ich meine wenn man sich mal den Spass macht und von den tausenden Explorern die ganzen Resourcen zusammenrechnet, dann müsste es doch eine Schwemme von Gold, Silber Kupfer usw. geben oder etwa nicht?

Bitte in einfachen Worten erklären..Kein Fachchinesisch...

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag113/127, 15.06.11, 10:35:51 
Antworten mit Zitat
dukezero schrieb am 02.09.2009, 11:06 Uhr
Ich beobachte immer der Short Long Positionen im Future Handel. Die Preise werden auch hier getrieben!

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag112/127, 15.06.11, 10:36:11 
Antworten mit Zitat
zerberus schrieb am 03.09.2009, 07:28 Uhr
@golden times & dukezero

Dank Euch für Eure Antworten

Hat noch jemand Ideen zur Klärung dieses "Paradoxons"

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag111/127, 15.06.11, 10:36:27 
Antworten mit Zitat
zerberus schrieb am 03.09.2009, 07:29 Uhr
dukezero schrieb am 02.09.2009, 11:06 Uhr
Ich beobachte immer der Short Long Positionen im Future Handel. Die Preise werden auch hier getrieben!



Meinst Du damit die Netto Long/Netto Short Kontrakte?

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag110/127, 15.06.11, 10:36:37 
Antworten mit Zitat
greenhorn schrieb am 03.09.2009, 10:44 Uhr
Hallo,

im Prinzip hast du mit der Annahme Recht das es noch soviele Rohstoffe im Boden gibt - allerdings ist die profitable Förderung zum allergrößten Teil so teuer das die Beträge die da bewegt werden nicht so ohne weiteres fließen
der nächste Faktor ist die Zeit - es dauert eben auch oft Jahre (Osisko bsp.weise ca. 5-6 Jahre) bis nach Exploration eine produzierende Mine ensteht - egal wieviel Geld zu reinpumpst, es dauert eben

und dann eben noch die Anleger/Investorenlogik - zb. Potash etc. - alle wissen das die Düngernachfrage wachsen wird mit wachsender Menscheit und das die momentanen förderbaren Reserven die Nachfrage nicht decken werden können..........trotzdem wird der Geldhahn für Explorer zugedreht weil die Konjunktur ja nich läuft/Riskiobereitschaft sinkt

golden_times hat das ja auch gut beschrieben; dem schließe ich mich an:

"Faktisch betrachtet können wir ca. 5000 börsennotierte Explorer, Developer und Produzenten an den Börsen in Kanada und Australien handeln. Die Hälfte dieser Werte sind banal gestrickte Explorer, die meistens nur eines oder wenige, völlig unerforschte Projekte vorweisen können. Ohne größere Finanzierungen und tatkräftige Kapitalgeber kommen diese Firmen wegen der fehlenden Selektion schnell unter Druck, eine starke Verwässerung ist in vielen Fällen unausweichlich.
Schätzungsweiße 1000 der übrigen Werte haben ein gegenwärtig tragfähiges Geschäftsmodell, eine relativ sichere geopolitische Lage, rohstoffreiche Liegenschaften und eine reale Möglichkeit (bzw. Begebenheit), Rohstoffe aus diesen Liegenschaften gegenwärtig und(/oder) in Zukunft ökonomisch zu fördern. Von diesen letzten 1000 Werten (global betrachtet doch wirklich keine große Anzahl) sind die meisten Werte natürlich Produzenten.
Wieviele Werte bleiben dann noch für die großen und erfolgreiche Explorer -> Produzenten-Storys übrig? Diese wenigen Werte gilt es zu finden.."


zerberus schrieb am 03.09.2009, 07:28 Uhr
@golden times & dukezero

Dank Euch für Eure Antworten

Hat noch jemand Ideen zur Klärung dieses "Paradoxons"

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag109/127, 15.06.11, 10:36:46 
Antworten mit Zitat
dukezero schrieb am 03.09.2009, 13:25 Uhr
zerberus schrieb am 03.09.2009, 07:29 Uhr
dukezero schrieb am 02.09.2009, 11:06 Uhr
Ich beobachte immer der Short Long Positionen im Future Handel. Die Preise werden auch hier getrieben!



Meinst Du damit die Netto Long/Netto Short Kontrakte?


Exact!

Darüber hinaus gibt es Sentimentsbefragungen, die ist im Moment z.b.bei Gold optimistisch.

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag108/127, 15.06.11, 10:37:27 
Antworten mit Zitat
Frechdax schrieb am 12.09.2009, 09:28 Uhr
Terminstruktur der Rohstoffe gefragt. Wer in Rohstoffe investiert, sollte die Preise von Kontrakten mit späterer Fälligkeit im Blick haben.

In Industriemetalle, Energieträger und Agrarprodukte können Investoren über Terminkontrakte (Futures) investieren. Diese stellen Verpflichtungen zur Rohstofflieferung bei Fälligkeit dar.
Dadurch sparen die Anleger teure Lagerhaltungskosten und Transportkosten. In den Preisen der Futures spiegeln sich Lagerhaltungskosten und Zinsbindungskosten sowie Erwartungen der Marktteilnehmer bezüglich der künftigen Preisentwicklung eines Rohstoffs. Wer längerfristig in einzelne Rohstoffe investiert, sollte diese Preisabweichungen der Futures im Blick haben. Rohstoff-Investments müssen in einem bestimmten Zyklus von einem Terminkontakt mit kürzerer Laufzeit
in einen Terminkontrakt mit längerer Laufzeit gerollt werden.

Der Prozess des Austauschs der Basiswerte wird als „Rollen“ bezeichnet. Backwardation bedeutet,
dass der länger laufende Future einen niedrigeren Preis als der kürzer laufenden Future aufweist. Bleibt der für die Zukunft erwartete Preisrückgang aus, können Investoren, die auf einen steigenden Rohstoffpreis gesetzt haben, einen Gewinn erzielen.

Contango bedeutet, dass der Future mit späterer Fälligkeit über dem Future mit früher Fälligkeit notiert. Eine solche Situation entsteht, wenn am Markt die Erwartung steigender Preise in dem Rohstoff vorherrscht. Die Preissteigerung wird am FutureMarkt vorweggenommen. Wer hier
auf einen anziehenden Rohstoffpreis setzt, kann nur verdienen, wenn der Rohstoff noch stärker steigt, als dies der Markt bereits erwartet. Ergo: Ein Contango schmälert die Gewinnchance.


gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag107/127, 15.06.11, 10:37:38 
Antworten mit Zitat
Azul Real schrieb am 20.09.2009, 23:03 Uhr
Salziges Gold
Lithium-Rausch in Bolivien

20.09.2009, 21:01

Von Peter Burghardt

Historische Chance für Bolivien: Das arme Land könnte mit Hilfe von Bodenschätzen reich wie Saudi-Arabien werden. Denn es verfügt über den Rohstoff für die virtuelle Welt - Lithium.



Ultradünne Lithium-Batterie: Bolivien verfügt über das Gold der Zukunft, doch es fehlt an Infrastruktur in dem Land im Herzen Lateinamerikas. (Foto: dpa)

Als Quelle von Bodenschätzen ist Bolivien seit Jahrhunderten gefragt, damit allerdings hat das Land im Herzen Südamerikas bisher wenig gute Erfahrungen gemacht. Schon die spanischen Kolonialherren gruben in den Bergen von Potosí nach Silber, die Stollen standen einst sprichwörtlich für den sagenhaften Reichtum aus der Neuen Welt.

Mit dem Edelmetall aus den Anden hätte sich einst eine Brücke über den Atlantik bis in die spanische Stadt Sevilla bauen lassen, hieß es. Doch daran und auch an Gas und Eisenerz verdienten vornehmlich Fremde und eine kleine Minderheit im Land. Die Republik ist heute der ärmste Staat der Region, Potosí wurde zum Symbol der Ausbeutung.

Jetzt interessieren sich wieder einmal Weltfirmen für das geplagte Bolivien, diesmal geht es um einen ebenso alten wie vermeintlich banalen Grundstoff: Salz. Dessen Zusatz soll Autos antreiben und Computer, die Umwelt schützen und die Abhängigkeit vom Erdöl mindern.

Im Salzsee von Uyuni liegen auf 3700 Metern Höhe die mit Abstand größten Vorkommen von Lithium. Das Leichtmetall wurde bis vor einiger Zeit hauptsächlich in kleinen Mengen für Antidepressiva und für die Rüstungsindustrie gebraucht.


Dann kamen moderne Laptops und Neuheiten wie iPod und iPhone, betrieben mit ausdauernden Lithium-Ionen-Batterien. Und nun, so sieht es aus, folgt die Ära der Elektrovehikel, die noch viel leistungsfähigere Akkus dieser Art verlangen. Bei der Frankfurter Automobilmesse stellen gerade wieder alle möglichen Hersteller ihre Alternativen vor, denn den Verbrennungsmotoren geht irgendwann der Sprit aus. Bei der Frage, wo all der Speicherstoff für den benzinlosen Tank künftig herkommen soll, landet die Industrie vorneweg bei diesem "Salar de Uyuni" zwischen Vulkanen im bolivianischen Hochland.

Unter der weißen Oberfläche des größten Salzsees der Welt werden auf 10.000 Quadratkilometern mehr als die Hälfte der globalen Lithium-Reserven vermutet, geschätzte 5,4 Millionen Tonnen, gebunden in der Salzlake. eek

Es folgen mit einigem Abstand Anbieter in Chile, Argentinien und Tibet.

Dies sei "die Weltressource der Zukunft", schwärmt der Berater Oscar Ballivián in La Paz. Bolivien könne das Saudi-Arabien des Alkalimetalls werden, heißt es. Europäische, japanische und US-amerikanische Unternehmen gieren nach dem wüstenartigen Standort, der bisher hauptsächlich Touristen fasziniert.

Allerdings fehlen Straßen, Strom, Technik und Produktionsanlagen; auch hat Bolivien längst seinen Zugang zum Meer verloren. Traditionell graben indianische Salzbauern mit den Händen im gleißenden Licht, begleitet von Lamas und Flamingos. Und zweitens will sich Bolivien dieses weiße Gold nicht genauso billig wegnehmen lassen wie einst das Silber.

Unter Präsident Evo Morales wurden Rohstoffe durch ein Gesetz staatlicher Kontrolle unterstellt, Morales ist Sozialist und der erste indigene Staatschef der Region. In dem Dorf Rio Grande beginnt seine Regierung mit einem bescheidenen Versuch, für sechs Millionen Dollar Lithium zu fördern. Geplant aber sind nun milliardenschwere Großprojekte.

Die Regierung Morales verhandelt mit Konzernen wie Mitsubishi, Sumitomo und Bolloré sowie mit Interessenten aus Iran. Wer fördern darf, muss dies allerdings unter staatlicher Kontrolle tun. Bolivien will lieber fertige Batterien verkaufen, als nur den Rohstoff zu exportieren. Eine historische Chance: Uyuni soll kein Potosí werden.

(SZ vom 21.09.2009)

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag106/127, 15.06.11, 10:38:10 
Antworten mit Zitat

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag105/127, 15.06.11, 10:38:54  | The Trouble with Geologists: A Primer for the Lay Investor
Antworten mit Zitat
The Trouble with Geologists: A Primer for the Lay Investor

http://www.24hgold.com/english/news....p;contributor=Mickey+Fulp
gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag104/127, 15.06.11, 10:39:07 
Antworten mit Zitat
dukezero schrieb am 29.09.2009, 09:30 Uhr
Rules for Successful Bashing:

1. Be anonymous

2. Use 10% fact. 90% suggestion. The facts will lend credibility to
your suggestions.

3. Let others help you learn about the stock. Build rapport and a
support base before initiating your Bashing routine.

4. Enter w/ humor and reply to all who reply to you.

5. Use multiple ISP's, handles and aliases.

6. Use two (2) or more aliases to simulate a discussion.

7. Do not start with an all out slam of the stock. Build softly.

8. Identify your foes (Longs) and the boards "guru" Use them to
your advantage. Lead them do not follow their lead.

9. Only Bash until the tide/momentum turns. Let doubt carry it the
rest of the way.

10. Give the appearance of being open minded.

11. Be bold in your statements. People follow strength.

12. Write headlines in caps with catchy statements.

13. Pour it on as your position gains momentum. Not your personality.

14. Don't worry about being labeled a "Basher". Newbies won't
know your history.

15. When identified put up a brief fight, then back off. Return in an
hour unless your foe is a weak in reasoning powers.

16. Your goal is to limit the momentum of the run. Not to tank the
company or create a plunge in the stock; be subtle and consistent.

17. Kill the dreams of profits, not the company or the stock.

18. Use questions to create critical thinking. Statements to
reinforce facts.

19. DO NOT LIE, NAME CALL or USE PROFANITY.

20. Encourage people to call the company. 99% won't. They'll take your
word for claims made. If they do call you can always find something
that is inaccurate in how they report their findings.

21. Discourage people from believing Press Releases.
Encourage them to call the company. They won't out of laziness.

22. If the companies history/PR's are negative constantly point to
that. Compile a list of this data prior to beginning your efforts.

23. If the price rises blame it on the hype or the PR, temporary
mass reaction, the market, etc. Anything but the stock itself.

24. If other posters share your concerns, play on that and share
theirs too.

25. Always cite low volume, even when it's not.

26. Three or four aliases can dominate a board and wear down the
longs.

27. Bait the Longs into personal debates putting their
focus/efforts on you and not the stock or facts. Divert their
attention from facts.

28. Promote other stocks that would-be investors can turn to
instead of the one your Bashing.

30. Do not fall for challenges on the "values" of what you are doing,
it's a game and you are playing it with your own rules.

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag103/127, 15.06.11, 10:39:18 
Antworten mit Zitat
dukezero schrieb am 12.10.2009, 11:19 Uhr
Contango beschreibt eine Preissituation bei Warentermingeschäften, bei der der aktuelle Marktpreis für Rohstoffe niedriger ist als der Terminpreis (Liefertermin in der Zukunft).

„Die Äpfel am Baum sind teurer als die Äpfel auf dem Markt.”

Lagerkosten - die Gesamtkosten der Lagerung eines Rohstoffs, von Lagergebühren über Versicherungskosten bis hin zu Zinsen und Schwund - sind ein wichtiger Grund, warum Rohstoffe mit Liefertermin in der Zukunft teurer sind als zum aktuellen Zeitpunkt. Daher kosten Futures in der Regel umso mehr, je weiter der Liefertermin in der Zukunft liegt. Wenn diese Kosten der Grund einer solchen Preissituation sind, sagen Rohstoffhändler, dass die Kontrakte mit Contango gehandelt werden.

Das Gegenteil von Contango ist Backwardation.



Goldman Sachs, Aktuelle Themen
Die Contango-Falle
Seit dem Sommer des vergangenen Jahres sind die Kurse vieler Rohstoffe massiv eingebrochen. Die Forwardkurven vieler Energieträger, Metalle und Landwirtschaftsprodukte zeigen seither steil ansteigende Verläufe. Diese Formationen können Neuengagements im Rohstoffsektor erschweren. Denn es drohen sogenannte Rollverluste, die die Renditen belasten können.

Quelle: Fotolia

Was vor gut einem halben Jahr undenkbar schien, ist Realität geworden. Der Preis für Rohöl ist erheblich gesunken. Im Juli 2008 noch zu fast 150 Dollar je Fass gehandelt, kostet das „schwarze Gold“ heute rund 40 Dollar. Je nach Sorte liegt der Preis knapp oberhalb (Brent) oder knapp unter dieser Marke (WTI). Dabei ist der Energiesektor kein Einzelfall. So erfuhren die Industriemetalle ähnlich wie das Öl einen Höhenflug, der über Jahre andauerte.

Vor allem der Städtebau in Asien und Investitionen in Infrastruktur verschlangen Unmengen an Kupfer, Aluminium und Zink. Mit dem Abebben der Nachfrage gerieten auch die Preise unter Druck. Eine Tonne Kupfer, die an der London Metal Exchange (LME) im Sommer 2008 noch über 8.000 Dollar kostete, wurde Anfang Februar 2009 für rund 3.500 Dollar gehandelt.

Auch im Agrarsektor kam es zu Kurseinbrüchen. So hat sich beispielsweise der Preis für Mais, ausgehend von gut 7 Dollar, in etwa halbiert. Zuvor waren die Notierungen des Getreides deutlich gestiegen, weil neben der Nahrungs- und Futtermittelnachfrage der Biokraftstoffsektor als zusätzlicher Nachfrager hinzukam. Auch die anderen wichtigen Getreidearten Weizen und Sojabohnen verzeichneten hohe Verluste. Eine der wenigen Ausnahmen innerhalb des gesamten Rohstoffsektors ist Gold. Das Edelmetall, das in Krisen als „sicherer Hafen“ gilt, hielt sich vergleichsweise stabil.

Nachteile durch Contango

Die Kursverluste haben noch einen zweiten Effekt: Viele Forwardkurven haben inzwischen einen steigenden Verlauf angenommen, auch Contango genannt. In der Forwardkurve sind die Preise von Futureskontrakten mit unterschiedlichen Laufzeiten dargestellt. Die Preise der Futures sind für Rohstoffinvestoren relevant. Denn abgesehen von einigen Edelmetallen wie Gold oder Silber erwerben Anleger den Rohstoff für gewöhnlich nicht direkt. Sie haben nur ein Interesse, an möglichen Preissteigerungen zu partizipieren, aber nicht an einer physischen Lieferung der Ware. Die Lieferung und Lagerung wäre auch problematisch, vor allem bei verderblichen Gütern aus dem Agrarsektor.

Der Kauf von Terminkontrakten löst das Problem der Lagerung, bringt aber andere Besonderheiten mit sich. Es gibt beispielsweise nicht nur einen Rohölpreis der Sorte Brent, sondern mehrere Futureskontrakte mit unterschiedlichen Fälligkeitsterminen, beispielsweise März, Juli oder Dezember 2009. Open-End-Zertifikate beziehen sich in der Regel auf den nächstfälligen Kontrakt. Da dieser aber bald ausläuft, muss er rechtzeitig in den Folgekontrakt getauscht werden. Dieser Tauschprozess wird in der Praxis als „Rollen des Kontrakts“ bezeichnet.

Der Rollprozess kann für den Investor zusätzliche Gewinne, aber auch Verluste bedeuten – je nachdem, ob die Forwardkurve fällt oder steigt. Bei einer steigenden Forwardkurve (Contango) drohen Rollverluste, weil der auslaufende Futurekontrakt billiger ist als der folgende, der gekauft werden muss. Bei einer fallenden Kurve (Backwardation) können hingegen Rollerträge entstehen, da der auslaufende Kontrakt teurer ist als der folgende, der ihn ersetzt.

Nach den Kursverlusten der vergangenen Monate haben viele Rohstoffe nun Contango-Formationen angenommen. Ein Beispiel hierfür ist Brent-Rohöl. Bei Getreidearten ist ein solcher Verlauf die Regel. An den Märkten für Energierohstoffe war jedoch in der Vergangenheit oft eine Backwardation zu beobachten. Bei Industriemetallen wie Kupfer ist ein Contango sogar eher selten zu beobachten. Einer der wenigen Rohstoffe, der sich aktuell in einer Backwardation befindet, ist Kakao.

Verschiedene Lösungsansätze

Hält eine Contango-Formation über einen längeren Zeitraum an, können für Inhaber von Open-End-Zertifikaten enorme Renditenachteile entstehen, die mögliche Kursgewinne aus Preissteigerungen des Rohstoffs sogar überkompensieren können. Es gibt aber Produkte, die Anlegern dabei helfen, die Nachteile aus der Contango-Situation zumindest zu begrenzen.

Eine mögliche Lösung besteht darin, das Rollen und somit auch mögliche Rollverluste von vornherein zu vermeiden – beispielsweise mit den Cap-Bonus-Zertifikaten auf die Rohölsorte Brent, die Goldman Sachs jüngst emittiert hat. Hierbei wird jeweils auf nur einen Brent-Futurekontrakt gesetzt, der bis zum Ende der Laufzeit des Zertifikats läuft. Ein Rollen entfällt. Was Anleger dabei beachten sollten: Für eine mögliche Barriereverletzung während der Laufzeit wird allerdings immer der jeweils nächstfällige Kontrakt beobachtet. Aktuell ist das der März-2009-Kontrakt.

Bonus-Zertifikate mit Cap eignen sich für Seitwärtsbewegungen eines bestimmten Basiswerts, aber auch für leichte Auf- oder Abwärtsszenarien. Am Ende der Laufzeit sind zwei unterschiedliche Auszahlungsprofile möglich, je nachdem, ob der Kurs des Basiswerts das Absicherungsniveau des Zertifikats unterschritten hat oder nicht.

Unterschreitet der Referenzkurs des Brent-Rohöl-Futures das Absicherungsniveau zu keinem Zeitpunkt, so kommt der Inhaber des Zertifikats in den Genuss der Bonuszahlung, die bei diesen Produkten gleichzeitig den maximalen Rückzahlungsbetrag darstellt. Unterschreitet der Basiswert dagegen das Absicherungsniveau, so verliert der Anleger den Anspruch auf den Bonus. Er erhält am Ende der Laufzeit genau die Performance des Basiswerts, bis maximal zum Cap, ausgezahlt. Im Falle einer negativen Performance des Basiswerts kann es zu Verlusten bis hin zum Totalverlust des eingesetzten Kapitals kommen, wenn der Kurs des Brent-Rohöl-Futures bis auf null fallen sollte.

Strategien zur Rolloptimierung

Ein zweiter Ansatz zielt nicht auf das Vermeiden, sondern auf das Optimieren von Rollprozessen ab. Die S&P GSCI Crude Oil A1-Strategie versucht, eine Mehrrendite gegenüber dem statischen S&P GSCI Crude Oil Index zu erzielen. Dabei soll die Outperformance nicht durch eine andere Gewichtung der im Index enthaltenen Rohstoffe erzielt werden, sondern durch eine Optimierung von Rollrenditen. Zunächst werden die Rolltermine vorgezogen. Statt innerhalb des Zeitfensters zwischen dem 5. und 9. Handelstag eines Monats wird hier zwischen dem 1. und 5. Handelstag gerollt.

Zusätzlich zu dieser statischen Änderung der Rollprozesse wird ein modifiziertes Verfahren zum Rollen der Kontraktfälligkeiten angewendet. Sollte es zu einer Contango-Situation kommen, bei der weniger als 0,5% Preisunterschied zum nächstfälligen Future besteht, wird in den nächstfälligen Future gerollt. In dem Fall, dass dieser Unterschied jedoch größer als 0,5% sein sollte, wird nicht in den nächstfälligen Kontrakt gerollt, sondern in den sechstnächste
Kontrakt. Dieser Test wird monatlich durchgeführt.

Die passenden Produkte zu den optimierten Rollstrategien werden in der aktuellen Ausgabe des KnowHow-Magazins auf Seite 13 vorgestellt.

Der Rohstoff-Radar von Goldman Sachs: Die wichtigen Rohstoffe "auf dem Radar" wöchentlich per E-Mail >> kostenlos abonnieren














Öl (Rohöl, Gasöl) wird zumeist in Form von Warentermingeschäften an der Börse gehandelt. Je nach Liefertermin ergeben sich dabei Preisunterschiede. Als Contango-Markt bezeichnet man eine Marktsituation, in der Kontrakte, deren Liefertermin weiter in der Zukunft liegt, höher gehandelt werden als der aktuelle Marktpreis ist. Die Markteilnehmer rechnen mit steigender Nachfrage. „Das Öl im Supertanker auf dem Meer ist teurer als das Öl beim Heizölhändler um die Ecke.“

* Beispiel: Ein Barrel Brent Crude Rohöl (Nordseeöl) zur Lieferung im Juli 2009 kostet 55 $
* Ein Barrel Brent Crude Rohöl (Nordseeöl) zur Lieferung im August 2009 kostet 57 $
* Ein Barrel Brent Crude Rohöl (Nordseeöl) zur Lieferung im Juli 2010 kostet 70 $

Häufig kosten Futures-Kontrakte in der Zukunft mehr als zum aktuellen Zeitpunkt, da für die Lagerung des Rohstoffs einige Kosten anfallen, wie z. B. Lagergebühren, Zinsen, Versicherungskosten, etc. Je weiter das Termingeschäft in der Zukunft liegt, desto höher wird es dann auch gehandelt. Man spricht dann auch von einer ansteigenden Termintreppe. Das Gegenteil zum Contango ist Backwardation.



http://www.ftd.de/finanzen/derivate....sen-oelwetten/460720.html

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag102/127, 15.06.11, 10:39:35 
Antworten mit Zitat
http://www.corebox.net/browse.php?t=company
gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag101/127, 15.06.11, 10:39:57 
Antworten mit Zitat
https://www.theice.com/productguide....tDetails.shtml?specId=194
gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag100/127, 15.06.11, 10:40:23 
Antworten mit Zitat
http://www.sfsc.gov.sk.ca/ssc/files....43-302amendedjan24-03.pdf
gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag99/127, 15.06.11, 10:40:51 
Antworten mit Zitat
Global_Investor schrieb am 16.11.2009, 21:09 Uhr
Top-10 worst mining jurisdictions in the world

Think twice before investing in these places

Investors spend a good deal of time determining the best places to invest, but do you ever wonder which countries are the worst places in the world to invest? If you invest in mining companies, you should. After all, when you invest in a mining company, you’re not just investing in a company but also the government and communities in which the company is exploring for and developing deposits.

So much about the success of a project depends upon the jurisdiction in which it exists that most institutional investors simply won’t put money into a company operating in certain countries. Sure you can find a deposit in Venezuela, for example, but leaders like Hugo Chavez, who are in the habit of decreeing bizarre legislation such as a recent ban on singing in the shower in Venezuela also have a penchant for stealing mineral deposits from whomever they please.

The Fraser Institute’s Survey of Mining Companies 2008/2009 is one measure of how mineral endowments and public policy factors such as taxation and regulation affect exploration investment in countries around the world. This year the survey considered 71 countries based on factors such as these and gave each a score out of 100. The findings were fascinating, to say the least. In this essay, we’ve compiled the Worst 10 performers from the Fraser Institute’s Policy Potential Index.

Keep in mind, however, that just because a country is listed at the bottom of the list doesn’t mean that some companies won’t find staggering success operating there. In September this year, for example, Dynasty Metals poured its first gold at its Zaruma mine in Ecuador. That country is the second worst performer on this list, but that hasn’t stopped Dynasty from bringing the benefit of revenues to its shareholders.

Additionally, countries can move through the rankings quite quickly between years. The average score of the Canadian provinces and territories improved by 3.8 points from last year. On the other hand, Latin American scores continue to decline. In the 2005/06 survey, the average score was 51.2 compared to 37.3 in this year.

10. Indonesia, Grade 25.1/100

Assuming industry “best practices,” the first country on our list would actually be the 10th best country on the Policy Potential Index, according to the 658 survey responses the Fraser Institute received. That’s probably because Indonesia is one of the world’s largest producers of tin (ranked second after China), coal (ranked the third largest thermal coal exporter after Australia and South Africa) and copper (ranked third largest, after the USA and Chile). It also produces significant quantities of gold, nickel and sulfur (above).

Whereas Latin American countries so often struggle with indigenous opposition to mining companies holding lands, Indonesia has deep issues simply creating and managing a regulatory system. One CEO said, “In Indonesia, disputes between local and federal government have in several cases given two different companies access to the same ground.”

Major issues among respondents were security, political stability and infrastructure, which paint a familiar picture of the Indonesia we so often see in the headlines: Religious tension has increasingly brought violence; Indonesia has the largest population of Muslims in the world, and is increasingly a center for extremism.

9. DRC Congo, Grade 24.1/100

DRC Congo is another one of those countries that has vast potential. Assuming industry best practices, the Fraser Institute survey respondents ranked it 19 out of 71 countries. Diamonds, gold and rare minerals are plentiful. However, one of the most important minerals in the DRC is coltan, from which niobium and tantalum are extracted. The latter two minerals are important in the manufacture of cell phones, DVD players and computers.

The trouble in the DRC is a war that has raged on/off since 1996 that has claimed from five to six million lives, depending on the report you read. The conflict is complex, involves several neighboring countries and is partly rooted in disputes over land ownership, but mostly it is a battle for the vast natural resources the region possesses.

8. Kyrgyzstan, Grade 22.5/100

Kyrgyzstan was a new addition to the survey this year (as were Guatemala and Norway). Although this country is not particularly rich in resources, it still places fourth overall in the category of Room to Improve. One junior mining executive wrote, “Kyrgyzstan! The government is totally corrupt and ignorant of modern economics.”

While Kyrgyzstan enjoys fewer problems when it comes to relations with indigenous peoples and policy regarding protected wilderness areas, it’s in the realms of policy, taxation, political stability and infrastructure (for which Kyrgyzstan found itself in last place) that this nation shows its true colours.

After protesters and opposition party members deposed the last government in the 2005 Tulip Revolution, the country has struggled to stabilize – and modernize. Nevertheless, little historic exploration and substantial gold reserves make this an attractive target for some exploration companies.

7. Zimbabwe, Grade 19.1/100

Zimbabwe is one of the most tragic stories in most every regard. The country’s dictator is a complete nut-job who has abused his power more openly than just about any world leader outside of Saddam Hussein. Moreover, Zimbabwe once enjoyed a prosperity like few other countries in Africa. Today the country has little economy to speak of, almost no infrastructure and what political structures remain are of little actual benefit to anyone but a small group of Robert Mugabe supporters.

As the President of one company with over $50 million in annual revenues stated, “Zimbabwe—would anyone go there?”

6. Bolivia, Grade 16.5/100

In the 470 years since the Spanish Conquest, Evo Moralez is the first indigenous leader of Bolivia. For resource investors, that’s the end of the good news. Moralez, a leftist of the same stripes as Hugo Chavez, in his first term in office nationalized natural gas, mining and telecommunications companies. And he’s just getting going. With another election due to take place this December, most analysts expect more nationalization in a post Moralez victory. Although 79% of respondents realize that Bolivia has mineral potential — given no land use restrictions — this is simply not a safe place to put investment dollars.

5. India, Grade 16.2/100

Liquid metal ( iron ) being poured in a ladel in pig iron plant in India

India is a curious case when it comes to foreign investment in mining. While the pool of labour in the country is generally excellent, India’s infrastructure, existing geological database and regulatory duplication and inconsistencies make the place often a quagmire of red tape and chaos.

Nevertheless, mining in India is a huge industry. An estimated one million people, including contract workers, are engaged in mining in India, the world’s second largest mining workforce after China’s.

However, in mining, India has often presented unwieldy barriers to entry. Canadian mining companies have discovered it’s difficult to reach lease agreements on land. As a message on India’s Ministry of Finance website states, “Foreign investors should be prepared to take India as it is with all its difficulties, contradictions and challenges.” That’s as clear as mud!

4. Honduras, Grade 11.8/100

The National Palace of Guatemala City, which is located at the northern end of Plaza Mayor, serves both for official receptions and as an art gallery.

Here the score starts sinking rapidly. Honduras is one of the western world’s most underdeveloped countries. Hurricane Mitch destroyed much of the country’s infrastructure along with the banana crop, the country’s third most important source of agricultural export revenue — who hasn’t eaten Honduras bananas their whole life long?

Mining investment is seen as a potential boost to the economy; Honduras produces lead, zinc, silver as well as gold and copper. The Fraser Institute found that Honduras struggles in many respects including political stability, quality of infrastructure and concerns regarding aboriginal land claims.

3. Guatemala, Grade 5.1/100

There are just a handful of mining companies still operating in Guatemala, largely due to issues surrounding indigenous groups. While companies like Inco for years operated in Guatemala, which is rich in antimony, lead, tungsten, nickel and copper, the country’s weak governments are typically short on clear mining regulations. The result has too often led to disenfranchised and poor indigenous communities around mine sites. Today, new projects are often met with resistance.

To be sure, Guatemala has great promise: In the Fraser report, 74% of respondents stated that country has mineral potential — assuming no land restrictions were in place. However in every other respect, the CEOs questioned said the country did not encourage investment, particularly when it comes to agreements with the government and communities.

2. Ecuador, Grade 4.1/100

The second lowest scorer on the Policy Potential Index is Ecuador. Surrounded by Columbia to the north and Peru to the east and south, Ecuador is a mineral rich country, but with deep political fissures and indigenous struggles. Ecuador has one of the world’s worst policy environments, but would tie for top rank in investment attractiveness under a “best policy” regime.

Perhaps that’s why Ecuador has been a very successful choice for some resource companies. Dynasty Metals and Mining has the producing Zaruma Gold Project, the first large scale modern mine and processing facility in Ecuador. The project was constructed on budget in a country that lacks an infrastructure for large scale mining.

Its mineral resource potential notwithstanding, indigenous uprisings, uncertainty regarding existing regulations, taxation nightmares and bureaucratic red tape make Ecuador the country with the most room for improvement.

1. Venezuela, Grade 3.7/100

Gasoline smugglers (pimpineros) with their contraband fell into the water of the river Táchira. One load of gasoline barrels may reach over 200 kilograms. [Cúcuta, the Colombia-Venezuela frontier]

As one company Vice President in the report said, “In Venezuela, if you build it, Hugo Chavez will steal it.” It doesn’t matter much how you look at Venezuela, this is one tricky place to build a mine. While the country ranks poorly in infrastructure and existing geological data, it’s right at the bottom when looking at political stability, labour regulations and security.

Today, Hugo Chavez’s government continues to seize control of mines in the country. On October 27, U.S. mining company Gold Reserve Inc. said that the Chavez regime had seized control of its lucrative Brisas del Cuyuni project in southeastern Bolivar state.

The trouble is, Chavez appears incapable of running mines himself, except into the ground. The result is increasing poverty and corruption, crumbling infrastructure and a country that is sliding backward economically and socially. Even Cuba is heading in the opposite direction.

Quelle: http://www.stockhouse.com/Columnist....urisdictions-in-the-world

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer
CCG-Redaktion



 PN schreiben

 

Beitrag98/127, 15.06.11, 10:41:03  | Primer
Antworten mit Zitat
golden_times schrieb am 21.11.2009, 18:28 Uhr
Share Structure, People, and Projects: A Primer for the Lay Investor

This is the second in a series of Musings in which my intent is to inform and educate the layman and help him become a better and more successful investor in the junior resource sector..

http://www.24hgold.com/english/news....p;contributor=Mickey+Fulp

gemäß § 34 WpHG dürfen die Autoren zu jederzeit Short- oder Long-Positionen in der/den behandelte(n) Aktie(n) halten. Bitte beachten Sie immer den Risikohinweis unter folgendem Link: Haftungsausschluß und Disclaimer

Seite 1 von 5
Beiträge der letzten Zeit anzeigen:   
 Zur Seite: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Weiter 
Einen neuen Beitrag hinzufügen Startseite » Börsenforum » Trading im Rohstoffsegment powered by CCG » Fachwissen im Rohstoffbereich Alle Zeiten sind GMT + 1 Stunde

Legende
Gehe zum Forum:  

Möchten Sie diese Anzeige nicht sehen, registrieren Sie sich kostenlos bei peketec.de und nutzen Sie unser Angebot mit weniger Werbung!